Article written by

Johanna Bond

Johanna Bond is a master's student in the community mental health counseling program at the Warner School of Education at the University of Rochester.  She is from the Rochester area and graduated from Swarthmore College in 2010 with a degree in psychology and English.

6 Responses

Page 1 of 1
  1. Laura Bond
    Laura Bond at |

    Johanna,
    I continue to thoroughly enjoy reading your blogs. You have great awareness, insight, and ability to make connections, and an amazing way of putting all that into words. Keep up the good work!

  2. Drew
    Drew at |

    I think that this entry brings up a good point.  Often, books and movies skip over recovery from traumatic events and characters return to their lives like nothing happened.  As you point out, Johanna, this is unrealistic; in the real world, people can’t suddenly decide that they are fine after they experience an emotionally devastating event.  I like your analysis and how you apply your counseling background to a modern movie like The Hunger Games.  Very interesting!

  3. Hans1s
    Hans1s at |

    I think you have a good point. But I think it’s better to procces than to forget. Because you will never forget such a thing and one day it will all come out.

  4. Ismail N
    Ismail N at |

    There are so many traumatic experience suffered in this world today, especially by women & children, not just soldiers.  Help from experts is sorely needed.  Victims/Patients should be given the choice on which path to choose – forget totally, learn from experience, etc.  If not left untreated, the effects could be devastating not only to them, but also to those around them.

  5. Jon Perry
    Jon Perry at |

    As a person who spent a career in the military, each person processes the experiences differently. One person may remember the killings. The other may be overjoyed they are home with their family and new life.
    I liken it to a normal distribution curve where the outcome of an event could be plotted by how an individual reacts to it. 9/11 is another great example. The survivors had different outcomes to the life changing event of that day. Each anniversary of 9/11 it brings back vivid memories of that day over a decade ago.
    Again, each person, even in exact similar circumstances will process the data differently.

  6. peopleiknow
    peopleiknow at |

    As a person who spent a career in the military, each person processes the experiences differently. One person may remember the killings. The other may be overjoyed they are home with their family and new life.
    I liken it to a normal distribution curve where the outcome of an event could be plotted by how an individual reacts to it. 9/11 is another great example. The survivors had different outcomes to the life changing event of that day. Each anniversary of 9/11 it brings back vivid memories of that day over a decade ago.
    Again, each person, even in exact similar circumstances will process the data differently.

Comments are closed.